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Uncle Tom's Cabin (Classic Collection (Grand Haven, Mich.).) (Classic Collection (Grand Haven, Mich.).)

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Item Number 417220  
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Item Specifications...

Est. Packaging Dimensions:   Length: 7.14" Width: 4.18" Height: 2.63"
Weight:   1.1 lbs.
Binding  Audio Cassette
Release Date   Mar 28, 2002
Publisher   Brilliance Audio Unabridged
ISBN  159086154X  
EAN  9781590861547  

Availability  0 units.

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Item Description...
Published in 1852, Uncle Tom's Cabin brought the abolitionists' message to the public conscience - no woman before or since has so moved America to take action against an injustice. Indeed, Abraham Lincoln greeted Stowe in 1863 as "the little lady who made this big war." Eliza Harris, a slave whose child is to be sold, escapes her beloved home on the Shelby plantation in Kentucky and heads North, eluding the hired slave catchers. Aided by the underground railroad, Quakers, and others opposed to the Fugitive Slave Act, Eliza, her son, and her husband George run toward Canada. As the Harrises flee to freedom, another slave, Uncle Tom, is sent "down the river" for sale. Too loyal to abuse his master's trust, too Christian to rebel, Tom wrenches himself from his family. Befriending a white child, Evangeline St. Clare, Tom is purchased by her father and taken to their home in New Orleans. Although Evangeline's father finally resolves to free his slaves, his sudden death places him in the ranks of those who mean well by their slaves but never take action. Tom is sent farther downriver to Simon Legree's plantation, and the whips of Legree's overseers.

Buy Uncle Tom's Cabin (Classic Collection (Grand Haven, Mich.).) (Classic Collection (Grand Haven, Mich.).) by Buck Schirner Harriet Beecher Stowe from our Audio Book store - isbn: 9781590861547 & 159086154X

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More About Buck Schirner Harriet Beecher Stowe

Register your artisan biography and upload your photo! Harriet Beecher Stowe, a prolific writer best remembered today for"Uncle Tom's Cabin, "was born in Litchfield, Connecticut, on June 14, 1811, into a prominent New England family. Her father, Lyman Beecher, was a well-known Congregational minister, and her brother Henry Ward Beecher became a distinguished preacher, orator, and lecturer. Like all the Beechers she grew up with a strong sense of wanting to improve humanity. At the age of thirteen Harriet Beecher enrolled in the Hartford Female Seminary and subsequently taught there until 1832, when the family moved to Cincinnati. In Ohio she was an instructor at a school founded by her elder sister Catharine, and she soon began publishing short stories in the"Western Monthly Magazine."
Four years later, in 1836, Harriet Beecher married Calvin Stowe, a respected biblical scholar and theologian by whom she had seven children. In order to supplement the family's meager income she continued writing."The Mayflower, " her first collection of stories and sketches, appeared in 1843. During this period abolitionist conflicts rocked Cincinnati, and Mrs. Stowe witnessed firsthand the misery of slaves living just across the Ohio River in Kentucky. But not until the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 was she inspired to write about their plight. After the family resettled in Brunswick, Maine, when Mr. Stowe was hired as a professor at Bowdoin College, she began working on a novel that would expose the evils of slavery.
First serialized in the"National Era, "an abolitionist paper, in forty weekly installments between June 5, 1851, and April 1, 1852, and published as a book on March 20, 1852, "Uncle Tom's Cabin"""was an enormous success. Tolstoy deemed it a great work of literature 'flowing from love of God and man, ' and within a year the book had sold more than 300,000 copies. When"Uncle Tom's Cabin"appeared in Great Britain Queen Victoria sent Mrs. Stowe a note of gratitude, and enthusiastic crowds greeted the author in London on her first trip abroad in 1853. In an attempt to silence the many critics at home who denounced the work as vicious propaganda, Mrs. Stowe brought out"A Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin"in 1853, which contained documentary evidence substantiating the graphic picture of slavery she had drawn."Dred"(1856), a second antislavery novel, did not enjoy the acclaim of"Uncle Tom's Cabin, "yet the author had already stirred the conscience of the nation and the world, fueling sentiments that would ignite the Civil War. When Abraham Lincoln met her at the White House in 1862 he allegedly remarked: 'So you're the little woman who wrote the book that started this great war!'
In subsequent novels Stowe shifted her attention away from the issue of slavery. Beginning with"The Minister's Wooing"(1859), and continuing withT"he Pearl of Orr's Island"(1862), "Oldtown Folks" (1869), and"Poganuc People"(1878), she presented a perceptive and realistic chronicle of colonial New England, focusing especially on the theological warfare that underscored Puritan life. In a second and less popular series of novels "My Wife and I"(1871), "Pink and White Tyranny"(1871), and"We and Our Neighbors"(1875) she depicted the mores of post-Civil War America. Mrs. Stowe did enjoy success, however, with the controversial"Lady Byron Vindicated"(1870), a bold defense of her friend Anne, Lady Byron, that scandalously revealed Lord Byron's moral delinquency. In addition she became a regular contributor to the"Atlantic Monthly," which published many of the memorable short stories later collected in"Oldtown Fireside Stories"(1872) and"Sam Lawson's Oldtown Fireside Stories"(1881).
Harriet Beecher Stowe wrote little during the last years of her life. She died in Hartford, Connecticut, on July 1, 1896. Perhaps Mrs. Stowe's achievement was best summed up by abolitionist Frederick Douglass who said: "Hers was the word for the hour."

Harriet Beecher Stowe was born in 1811 and died in 1896.

Harriet Beecher Stowe has published or released items in the following series...
  1. Bantam Classics
  2. Barnes & Noble Classics
  3. Dover Thrift Editions
  4. Enriched Classics (Pocket)
  5. Everyman's Library Classics & Contemporary Classics
  6. Ignatius Critical Editions
  7. Library of America
  8. Modern Library Classics (Paperback)
  9. Norton Critical Editions
  10. Oxford World's Classics (Paperback)
  11. Penguin American Library
  12. Signet Classics

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Reviews - What do our customers think?
Great works are timeless, especially this audio production  Nov 2, 2007
I am glad I took the advice of other customers and purchased the audio tape rather than CD version of this classic. Perfectly narrated...this novel must have rocked and shocked the United States. It is a literary wonder.
Uncle Tom's Cabin  Apr 3, 2007
The unabridged audio of "Uncle Tom's Cabin" is excellent in every way. This is a classic that should never be forgotten , and has more theology in it that most theology books. It also fairly portrays slavery and the arguments for and against. The real thing that makes this book so outstanding as in many audio editions, is the narrator, Buck Schinder. I don't believe I have ever heard a better reader who could make every character come alive with the correct personality. His mastery of the Negro dialect is amazing. This book is heartwarming as well as heartbreaking, and is full of truths, as Harriet Beecher Stowe did much research and many interviews with escaped slaves while writing it. I highly recommend it.
The most important book in American History  Jan 13, 2005
Uncle Tom is probably the most important single book written in the United States of America. No one is really familiar with American culture, literature, relgion, and history if she or he has not read Uncle Tom.

To understand this book, I would urge people to consult Eric J. Sundquist's book New Essays on Uncle Tom's Cabin (The American Novel) and Jane Tompkin's Sensational Designs. The 19th Century world and reader that Stowe aimed at read and understood things so differently, that you will miss much without knowing how to look at this book the way Stowe wrote to them and the way they read.

This book has a broad purpose: literary to decide what is wrong with the entire world and present an answer. If you follow the sweep of the book you will find Stowe takes on everything from whether the issues of the 1848 revolutions can be resolved on the side of Democracy, to the question of marital relations amogn the free and the white. The issue of slavery is not the book's only focus. It is, in fact, the solution.

Stowe's real thesis here is that American Chattel slavery is the number one evil in the world, that this evil corrupts every institution in society North and South and corrupts far beyond the borders of the United States, and that no compromise with it or avoidance of it is possible.

To Stowe, slavery is an abomination not just because of the cruelty, savagery, exploitation, and degradation involved, but above all, it is an abomination against God, the most unChrist-like behavior possible.

Thus the relgious solution she offers is to become more Christlike in your opposition to slavery and to finally undergrow the Christic experience of dying for your sins and being reborn in Jesus Christ. That's right, in Stowe's time evangelical Christianity, rather than being a fob for right-wing politics, was practiced by some of the militant and serious opponents of slavery.

Stowe creates figures that are Christlike who like Christ die rather than yield to sin and influence the others in their faith. The supreme figure is of course Uncle Tom. Uncle Tom, as a a pejorative, comes not from this novel, but from the Tom shows that blossomed in the late 19th century which were a presentation of a mock version of this story with racist minstrel like charicatures of the African American characters.

In this book, Uncle Tom is a physically majestic, heroic, dignified person, whose faith and dignity are never corrupted, whose death is shown as a parallel to that of Christ in the resurrection of the souls of all around him required to eliminate Slavery. If he is passive, never disobeys his masters, and seems to have not much of a material interest of his own in life, it is because to Stowe this a reflection of his Christic nature.

No doubt at best Stowe sees him as a "noble savage" at Best. There is no doubt if one reads this book and even more clearly STowe's Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin which provided documentation for this book's depiction of slavery, that it is clear that Stowe did not believe African Americans were equal to whites. Her then-current immigrationist views are expressed in the way the one intelligent independently acting Black couple presented here leave the US for Canada once they escape slavery.

Yet, this book accomplished the purpose it had. It galvanized millions of Americans and more millions around the world to dramatically oppose slavery. Uncle Tom was one of the first true international best sellers. In a smaller country, where literacy was lower, and when many people bought books through private libraries where families shared books and the book was often read to family gatherings rather than by one person, Uncle Tom sold two hundred thousand copies in its first year and sold a million copies between its publication and the civil war.

Stowe was honest in her afterward and in other writings to say that her description of slavery in Uncle Tom is much prettier and more nicer than slavery was. She believed an accurate depiction of slavery--Stowe had lived in Cincinatti on the board with slaving Kentucky and traveled through the South--would be so revolting that her target audience of Northern whites would not read this book.

Her book launched a torrent of responses from white southerners as could be expected. However, the popularity of her book encouraged white authors, but especially Black authors to write antislavery books that responded to Stowe. Some of the foundations of Black American literature by authors like Frederick Douglass, William Wells Brown, Harriet Jacobs, and Martin Delany are essentially response to Uncle Tom.

Perhaps the most dramatic is Delany's Blake or the Huts of America whose character is a double to Uncle Tom. However, Delany's hero does not submit to being sold "down the river." He instead runs away and travels throughout the US following the same course as the travels in Uncle Tom showing how slave conditions are so much worse than Stowe showed. Finished with that business, Blake leaves the United States for Cuba where he becomes part of a group of Afro-Cubans unwilling to suffer like Christ and Uncle Tom. Like the current leaders of Cuba, they start to organize an international revolution of Slaves and the oppressed!

Write your own review about Uncle Tom's Cabin (Classic Collection (Grand Haven, Mich.).) (Classic Collection (Grand Haven, Mich.).)

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