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Ready or Not: What Happens When We Treat Children As Small Adults [Paperback]

Our Price $ 14.41  
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Item Number 282378  
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Item Specifications...

Pages   296
Est. Packaging Dimensions:   Length: 1" Width: 6" Height: 9"
Weight:   1 lbs.
Binding  Softcover
Release Date   Nov 1, 2000
Publisher   Encounter Books
ISBN  1893554201  
EAN  9781893554207  


Availability  0 units.


Item Description...
Overview
"Children grow up too fast today!" This complaint, often tinged with a sense of bewilderment and helplessness, is heard with increasing frequency among parents today. Indeed, even the preteen "tweens" are sophisticated beyond their years, experiencing sexual and emotional aspects of life heretofore considered "adult" and facing emotional and material overload that in the relatively recent past would have daunted people twice their age. In Ready or Not, Kay Hymowitz offers a startling look at the forces in the popular culture that bombard our children today. In particular she shows how "experts" urging us to treat children as "small adults" have affected our ideas about childhood. The most pernicious effect of this new development, she believes, is that the independence and other trappings of maturity that children are given (rather than earned) at an early age makes them paradoxically less able to negotiate the passage to adulthood than their predecessors in an earlier, more protective time. This challenging book shows what happens when a culture gives up its traditional mission of handing down its wisdom and moral heritage to the next generation. it will make the reader think harder about the needs of children and the responsibilities of adults in a democratic society.

Publishers Description
“Children grow up too fast today!” This complaint, often tinged with a sense of bewilderment and helplessness, is heard with increasing frequency among parents today. Indeed, even the preteen “tweens” are sophisticated beyond their years, experiencing, sexual and emotional aspects of life heretofore considered “adult” and facing emotional and material overload that in the relatively recent past would have daunted people twice their age. In Ready or Not, Kay Hymowitz offers a startling look at the forces in the popular culture that bombard our children today. In particular she shows how “experts” urging us to treat children as “small adults” have affected our ideas about childhood. The most pernicious effect of this new development, she believes, is that the independence and other trappings of maturity that children are given (rather than earning) at an early age makes them paradoxically less able to negotiate the passage to adulthood than their predecessors in an earlier, more protective time.


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More About Kay S. Hymowitz

Register your artisan biography and upload your photo! Kay S. Hymowitz is the William E. Simon fellow at the Manhattan Institute and a contributing editor of City Journal, where she writes extensively on education and childhood in America. She also writes for many major publications including the New York Times, the Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The New Republic, New York Newsday, The Public Interest, Commentary, Dissent, and Tikkun. A regular commentator in the broadcast media, she earned a Masters of Philosophy from Columbia University and has taught at Brooklyn College and Parsons School of Design. She lives in Brooklyn, NY.

Kay S. Hymowitz currently resides in Brooklyn, in the state of New York. Kay S. Hymowitz was born in 1948.

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Reviews - What do our customers think?
Changed the way I see kids and how adults respond to them  Nov 13, 2002
I haven't finished this book, so I can't say that it ends the way I want it to. (With ideas on how to combat the anticultural movement.) But, I can say that the first few chapters changed my way of thinking about kids, education and the media. I can't go a day without something happening that illustrates what this author is talking about. I want to give this to all my teacher friends and make them read it. I think this book is a must for parents, administrators and teachers.
 
a knockout book  Sep 6, 2001
This book will give you straight answers and no educratese, no vague generalities, no junkspeak. Anybody who has spent time in a high school classroom needs answers, and this book has them. I have long wondered where the attitude that kids can raise themselves came from; the mindless idea that all children need is love, heavy warm eye contact, strokes, and flattery to develop them into mature adults; that children will always choose what is best for them --- in clothing, food, activities and entertainment --- if only stupid adults would stand aside. This book discusses that wierd, wierd, wierd idea. The reviewer who says that youth crime and violence is the same as in 1970 I suspect is simply prevaricating. But the idea that letting young people have anything they want --- or know to want --- is a wise parenting and teaching strategy has thoroughly permeated the society. Our local newspaper yesterday came out with an article about how parents are finding it difficult to say 'no' to ten-year-old girls who want to dress like streetwalkers in tube tops and jeans that show their navels. Maybe that's why certain male intellectuals cling to the idea; they just might love seeing those little girls in tube tops. Hmmmmmm?
The idea that young people are self-regulating devices seems to have soaked in at all levels and all cultures in this country. This books tells us where that idea came from and why certain people are busy disseminating it. It's a branch or sub-genre of Romanticism, the myth of the Noble Savage, and all the silly pastoralism that goes along with it. People who subscribe most determinedly to anticulturalism do so because they like to think of themselves as superior in kindness and refinement and insightto those who have a grip on reality. They are also lazy. It takes work to say No. Read this book!
 
a knockout book  Sep 6, 2001
This book will give you straight answers and no educratese, no vague generalities, no junkspeak. Anybody who has spent time in a high school classroom needs answers, and this book has them. I have long wondered where the attitude that kids can raise themselves came from; the mindless idea that all children need is love, heavy warm eye contact, strokes, and flattery to develop them into mature adults; that children will always choose what is best for them --- in clothing, food, activities and entertainment --- if only stupid adults would stand aside. This book discusses that wierd, wierd, wierd idea. The reviewer who says that youth crime and violence is the same as in 1970 I suspect is simply prevaricating. But the idea that letting young people have anything they want --- or know to want --- is a wise parenting and teaching strategy has thoroughly permeated the society. Our local newspaper yesterday came out with an article about how parents are finding it difficult to say 'no' to ten-year-old girls who want to dress like streetwalkers in tube tops and jeans that show their navels. Maybe that's why certain male intellectuals cling to the idea; they just might love seeing those little girls in tube tops. Hmmmmmm?
The idea that young people are self-regulating devices seems to have soaked in at all levels and all cultures in this country. This books tells us where that idea came from and why certain people are busy disseminating it. It's a branch or sub-genre of Romanticism, the myth of the Noble Savage, and all the silly pastoralism that goes along with it. People who subscribe most determinedly to anticulturalism do so because they like to think of themselves as superior in kindness and refinement and insightto those who have a grip on reality. They are also lazy. It takes work to say No. Read this book!
 
Insulting, overlooking, and Incorrect  Apr 15, 2001
This generation of kid's are the most controlled and watched ever. To say that teen rights extend to the point where a two medicalized teens can get guns, is insulting to society...for if an adult commits a crime by using a gun that way, it should be a crime for anyone else. It doesn't make sense to say that teen rights (which should teach them about the constitution and the right the live without prejudice and constraint without lawful reason), is harming because it let's them get guns and kill each other? The articles seen today either state teens and children as perfect little conformists, or violent drug addicts, who enjoy passing time by killing each other. That time, when hormones are surging, and when they are not, is when people look for who they really are. To better make choices about themselves. Think I'm just raising a bunch of hooligans? Think again. I'm 14-years old...and I think however well intended her research summery was, she is wrong about this generation.

In the schools I've attended and seen, the popular folks...well they aren't the sex, drug, and weird rituatlistic initianting sort you see on T.V. They get good grades, they are nasty when judging, but they aren't the sort you can really blame...they are mostlly preppies that think a lot of themselves. They are also in the minority. Though, like in the 'real' world, there are some that do consume a lot and revolve the world around themselves. There are many others who are artists, musicians, writers, school oriented, and have passions.

According to a Arizona's former Attorney General...1 percent of teens are in trouble. The other 99% of us who are trying to live lives in which benenfit society demand...no, expect to not be called degrading names and being insulted and spied on, when we walk down the street, because; 'after all, that book said that we shouldn't treat kids like adults, and adults can walk down the street without being stopped because of their age'.

No, you don't have to treat kids like 'adults' because we're not, we're newer than that. But treat us...like people, people who deserve to be helped, but not forced, and directed, but not ridiculed without reason.

In short: Don't read this book, seek to understand kids of your own before following the advice of some woman who obviously doesn't know kids at all...except maybe the Columbine shooters.

 
Great Overview Book  Jun 27, 2000
Hymowitz has provided a great overview of our current cultural syndrome. Unlike Kirkus, I do not think "anticulture" thesis is a strawman. Instead I find it to be a fascinating and effective description of the phenomena parents fight (or ignore) on a daily basis. The culturaly elite perspective (which permeates the Kirkus review) takes a deserved beating. I have placed this book on my website recommend list bookshelf because I think this book will help intellegent parents discern the background that drives and intensifies their parenting concerns. Good Work! Dear Mrs. Web
 

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