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Field Guide to Cocktails (Field Guide) [Paperback]

Our Price $ 14.04  
Retail Value $ 15.95  
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Item Number 390290  
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Item Specifications...

Pages   313
Est. Packaging Dimensions:   Length: 1.25" Width: 5" Height: 6.5"
Weight:   0.8 lbs.
Binding  Softcover
Release Date   Jul 1, 2005
Publisher   Quirk Books
ISBN  1594740631  
EAN  9781594740633  
UPC  082345306313  


Availability  2 units.
Availability accurate as of May 28, 2017 08:27.
Usually ships within one to two business days from La Vergne, TN.
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Item Description...
Finally, a field guide to preparing and identifying virtually every drink at the bar, from the Añejo Highball to the Caipirinha, from the Singapore Sling to the Zombie!
 
Field Guide to Cocktails is not an ordinary bartender’s guide. Here are more than 200 recipes for the world’s best libations, with tried-and-true classics like the Tom Collins and the Fuzzy Navel and contemporary favorites like the Mojito and the Cosmopolitan.
 
Full-color photographs of the cocktails are cross referenced to in-depth descriptions of the drinks. The histories are the stuff of legend: The Gin Rickey was mixed up to satisfy a thirsty lobbyist; Grog was drunk by sailors in the British Navy to prevent scurvy; and the Gibson was originally just a glass of water with an onion in it. You’ll also learn the most appropriate time and season to enjoy the drink, and you’ll get suggestions for the perfect food pairings—lobster with a Cape Codder, sharp cheese and crackers with a Gin and Tonic, black bean dip and chips with a Cuba Libre, and more.
 
So whether you’re planning a cocktail party or trying to identify a new drink to try at the bar, Field Guide to Cocktails is the only mixology book you’ll ever need. Cheers!
Rob Chirico is a bartender, writer, and drinks enthusiast living in Greenfield, Massachusetts. His writing has appeared in the magazine Gastronomica.

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Product Categories
1Books > Subjects > Cooking, Food & Wine > Drinks & Beverages > Bartending   [182  similar products]
2Books > Subjects > Cooking, Food & Wine > Drinks & Beverages > Spirits   [543  similar products]
3Books > Subjects > Cooking, Food & Wine > General   [7182  similar products]



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Reviews - What do our customers think?
great source of info  Nov 7, 2007
If you looking for info an how to make mixed drinks this book will come as a big help for you.
 
Will Wonders Never Cease? Maybe...  Nov 17, 2006
I was actually asked by this site to review my own book -- I suspect because I bought a couple of copies that I needed quickly -- and for less than my publisher discount at that. Since I do not deem it fare to do so (under my own name anyway), I will simply say that while it is not the best book I have ever written, it is at least the best book I have ever written that has been published so far. And it is a heck of a lot shorter than the new Pynchon tome. Keep New Orleans alive!
 
Time to Restock the Bar  Jan 3, 2006
As someone whose home bar currently comprises nothing more than gin, vodka, and a pathetic collection of triple sec, Rose's Lime Juice and Virgin Islands rum (a gift from vacationing parents), I skipped the recipes at first and went straight to the section of the book called ''Behind Bars: An Insider's Look at Ordering Out.'' Here was a list of useful tips for bar- and restaurantgoers. Among them:
* Since most mixed drinks contain 3 ounces of liquid and most shots contain just 1 ounce, it's more cost effective to order one ''bone-dry'' (i.e., no vermouth) Stoli or Jagermeister martini than it is to order three shots of Stoli or Jagermeister.
* Just as asking for ''a glass of wine'' will probably yield plonk, it's inadvisable to simply order ''a martini,'' say, or ''a gin and tonic''; doing so pretty much guarantees your drink will be made with generic spirits. If you care about how your cocktail tastes, order it by brand name: ''an Absolut martini,'' ''a Tanqueray and tonic.'' Know what you want and don't be afraid to ask for it.
* Speaking of Absolut Martinis, they may be my father's drink of choice, but they're an aberration to traditionalists. If you must have the classic gin cocktail, speak up about it already! Otherwise, resign yourself to the reality that you're just as likely to get a vodka-based version these days. Ditto for numerous other drinks. So specify, specify, specify.

The recipes are peerless - clear and concise - and there is a witty but equally historical intro to each. It also seems to be the only serious cocktail book out there that has food pairings with every recipe. I think my home bar can stand some updating, and this book is a great start.
 
Buy one for yourself, more to share!!  Dec 28, 2005
I've now bought two copies for myself (one to use, one autographed to be shown off!) and five for friends and relatives. The content is extensive (if you can't find it here, you probably shouldn't be drinking it!), the style is both witty and clear enough for the rankest amateur. Following is one recipe and description: see for yourself! (The following is ©2004, Rob Chirico, used by permission)

General Description:
Every so often a simple relaxing drink comes along with an equally carefree name. The Zombie is not one. The name conjures up such bygone film stars as Karloff and Lugosi with good reason. The nine-odd ingredients in a Zombie make for a lethal brew that is more the product of a mad scientist than a bartender.

The first Zombie was created by Ernest Raymond Beaumont-Gant (who for some obscure reason was called "Don the Beachcomber") in the 1930s as a hangover cure for a patron at Don's Los Angeles bar. The fellow returned to the bar a few weeks later, and Don asked him how he liked the drink. The customer replied, "I felt like the living dead." The Zombie went on to become the signature drink at the Hurricane Bar at the 1939 World's Fair in New York, and Trader Vic featured it on his menu. It has since become a standard drink at Chinese restaurants, where it continues to transform jovial patrons into the moribund characters of a George Romero flick. The addition of 151-proof rum likens the Zombie to a postmortem in a glass.

Purchase: Anywhere you spy a tiki statue, a paper drink parasol, or sticks of bamboo, you will find a Zombie lurking. Beware the dreaded premixed Zombie.

You may want to think twice before you order one of the world's most lethal cocktails, because you may not be able to think at all afterward. If you do decide to seek out one of these weapons of mass destruction, Polynesian lounges like Trader Vic's and other high-end resort hotels mix their Zombies fresh. Otherwise Zombies are usually prefab concoctions. Not counting the option of never, the time to order a Zombie is with appetizers before dinner.

The first Zombies were probably shaken, but the drink is more commonly mixed in a blender today. The daunting array of ingredients may persuade you to forgo fresh fruit juices, but if you are going to hell in a handbasket, the handle should be well made.

Areas and Time of Occurrence: You may want to think twice before you order one of the world's most lethal cocktails, because you may not be able to think at all afterward. If you do decide to seek out one of these weapons of mass destruction, Polynesian lounges like Trader Vic's and other high-end resort hotels mix their Zombies fresh. Otherwise, Zombies are usually prefab concoctions. Not counting the option of never, the time to order a Zombie is with appetizers before dinner.

Season: The Zombie may strike you as a summertime drink, but it will strike you whatever the season.

Preparation: The first Zombies were probably shaken, but the drink is more commonly mixed in a blender today. The daunting array of ingredients may persuade you to forgo fresh fruit juices, but if you are going to hell in a handbasket, the handle should be well made.

Affinities: Since the Zombie is the equivalent of a liquid pupu platter, indulge yourself and order that tiny hibachi surrounded by barbecued beef sticks, crab Rangoon, chicken, prawns, and crisp wontons.

Recipe for the Zombie:

¾ ounce fresh lime juice
1 ounce unsweetened pineapple juice
1 ounce fresh orange juice
1 ounce light rum
1 ounce dark rum
½ ounce apricot brandy
1 ounce passion fruit syrup
1 teaspoon superfine sugar
½ ounce 151-proof rum
Maraschino cherry, slice of orange, slice of pineapple, and a sprig of mint

Shaker method: Shake the three juices, light and dark rum, brandy, passion fruit syrup, and sugar with ice; then strain over ice into a chilled hurricane or other large glass. Float the 151-proof rum on top; then garnish with a maraschino cherry, an orange slice, a pineapple slice, and a mint sprig.

Blender method: Blend the three juices, light and dark rum, brandy, passion fruit syrup, and sugar with ½ cup crushed ice. Pour into a hurricane glass, and float the 151-proof rum on top; then garnish with a maraschino cherry, an orange slice, a pineapple slice, and a mint sprig.
 
Oooo....I thinkI sat on a Juniper Berry !!!  Dec 23, 2005
Wow ! They said its the only "mixology" I'll ever need and they're right! OUTSTANDING ! Unlike most of these guides, it reads almost like a novel. Packed with interesting discussions of the myths surrounding famous drinks with just enough dry humor to put one in the mood for testing a new concoction. This book would have been standard equipment in the glovebox of every Earl's Shooting Brake!

For novice and professional alike, this is the barkeeps Rosetta Stone !
 

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