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End Times Made Simple [Paperback]

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Item Specifications...

Pages   251
Est. Packaging Dimensions:   Length: 1" Width: 5.5" Height: 8.25"
Weight:   0.7 lbs.
Binding  Softcover
Release Date   Jun 1, 2006
Publisher   Calvary Press
ISBN  1879737507  
EAN  9781879737501  

Availability  0 units.

Item Description...
Piece by piece, Samuel E. Waldron strips away years of false teaching and faulty exegesis thrust upon the church to reveal what the Bible, in its own simple but profound way, says about what will happen at the end of this present age.

Publishers Description
Rapture?A Pre-Trib?A Post-Trib?A Millennium?A Confused? You should be A In today's Evangelical Christian world, eschatology a "" the study of the "Last Things" - has been turned into a sort of pseudo-science with a plethora of authors claiming to know exactly the scenario of events that are to take place just prior to the Lord Jesus Christ's return, as well as what the eternal state will be like.A Often, these authors come to rather bizarre and unbiblical conclusions. Piece by piece, Samuel E. Waldron strips away years of false teaching and faulty exegesis thrust upon the church to reveal what the Bible, in its own simple but profound way, says about what will happen at the end of this present age.

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More About Samuel E. Waldron

Register your artisan biography and upload your photo! Sam Waldron Samuel E. Waldron (born 1951) is a Reformed Baptist and professor of Systematic Theology at Midwest Center for Theological Studies (MCTS). In addition to teaching at MCTS, he is a pastor of Heritage Baptist Church in Owensboro, Kentucky.Waldron received a B.A. from Cornerstone University (1973), an M.Div. equivalency from Trinity Ministerial Academy, a Th.M. from Grand Rapids Theological Seminary (1987) and a Ph.D. from Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in 2005. From 1977 to 2001 he was a pastor of the Reformed Baptist Church of Grand Rapids.

Samuel E. Waldron currently resides in Owensboro. Samuel E. Waldron was born in 1951.

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Product Categories
1Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Reference > Prophecies   [786  similar products]
2Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Reference > Theology > General   [4167  similar products]
3Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Theology > Eschatology   [1030  similar products]
4Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Theology > Prophecy   [571  similar products]

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Reviews - What do our customers think?
A thoughtful and well argued introduction to amillennial eschatology, but far from simple  Oct 18, 2007
Samuel Waldron has done the Christian community a great service by writing a terrific book on the theological underpinnings of amillennialism for public consumption. We are inundated by the crazy, ever-changing predictions and end-times gloom of Hal Lindsey, the Zionist bombast of John Hagee, and a wide belief in the theologically vacuous notion of rapture. In the public sphere, support for various interpretations of the Bible depend more on how loudly and confidently the various proponents shout them than on any careful examiniation of their Biblical roots. It is the Christian Evangelists (the so-called dispensationalists) who shout the loudest, but are they correct? In this book, Dr. Waldron carefully examines the Biblical arguments that are commonly used to support dispensationalism, and systematically refutes them one by one. If you are looking for the antidote to aggresive dispensationalists, this is it.

The first half of the book is taken up describing the eschatalogical system of the Bible. Particular detail is placed on contrasting the amillennial and pre-millennial/dispensational lines of arguments. It is clear that Dr. Waldron has had many disputes with dispensationalists and he sets up his arguments on a firm foundation. In particular, he outlines his hermeneutical framework on how to interpret the Bible (i.e. how we know what we know) along a rational line. My personal view is that even once you make the leap of faith to accept that Christ died to save mankind, you are still a long way from the dispensational position and you need to be wearing your dispensational glasses to interpret the Bible in this manner.

Subsequent chapters deal with `What is Hell', `Is there a difference between national Isreal and biblical Israel' (this is a biggie for people like Hagee who claim that his interpretation of the Bible demands that the US govt support national Israel no matter what), `what is Heaven', and `what does the Bible teach about the resurrection'. In short, there is a wealth of information in this book about the interpretation of the Bible (as it has been interpreted historically by the Catholic church and otherwise since the resurrection).

In spite of the title, this is anything but simple. You'll have to reread sections several times, and you'll certainly need your Bible handy to look at various passages and study them in context. This is the kind of book that contains a mountain of information in every paragraph, but your persistance will be well rewarded with new insights and knowledge about the Bible. This is not a book for theologians though, I think that anyone with the interest and motivation can work through this book. Highly recommended.
Book lives up to its title  Dec 13, 2004
Samuel Waldron has provided a very clear and easy to follow understanding of Biblical prophecy from the a-millennial perspective. Anyone can read this and follow his very compelling argument. This work is an excellent starting point for reading about a-millennialism. Agree or disagree with the author, he will give you much to think about and work through. Fair, even-handed, and Biblical you will not be disappointed. The only weakness of this book is on the chapter on parables and end times. Waldron is not as strong here as in the rest of the book. However, this does not detract from the overall value of the book. A must read for those just beginning to seek to understand a-millennialism. This is also a good book to give to a pre-millennialist because of his fair and kind treatment of their view of last days. While Waldron does not waver in his convictions, he writes with a kindness toward those who disagree.
Simple, Straightforward End Times Theology  Nov 21, 2003
Although the author doesn't directly say it, Waldron presents in this book a simple, straightforward case for amillennialism. He does a good, thorough job of addressing the flaws of the extremely popular dispensational premillennialism ("Left Behind" theology). He avoids excessive use of technical jargon, and is easy to follow.

Waldron here, contrary to what many people may think of amillennialists, is very emphatic about the Bible being God's inerrant, inspired Word. He uses a simple approach to interpreting the Scriptures' stand on the end times -- start with the clear, literal passages as a basis, then build upon them with the less clear, figurative passages. He provides a several diagrams to make his views even easier to grasp.

This title is an excellent alternative to the "Left Behind" theology so prominent today. I recommend it highly.

A book that lives up to it's title  Jul 29, 2003
Waldron's book is titled "The End Times Made Simple," and for the most part he demonstrates the truth of that title. I have to add the caveat that understanding the end times will never be as simple as many other biblical doctrines. However, in this book, Waldron shows that the end times don't have to be as hard to understand as we tend to make them.

He begins the book with some simple principles of interpretation that are very helpful. When reading the bible we should read the clear before the difficult, the literal before the figurative and the general before the detailed. Such simple advice will go miles in helping us understand prophecy. For the most part, people who want to understand the end times run straight to the books of Daniel and Revelation, two of the mmore difficult, figurative and detailed books in the bible. Although he didn't state it this way, one of the strengths of the amillennial position that Waldron espouses is its emphasis on interpreting the prophetic books in light of the rest of the bible, rather than the other way around. Waldron's three simple principles of interpretation help the reader do this. The bible is full of prophetic material, which, if read first will give the student of bible prophecy a trajetory for reading books like Daniel and Revelation.

From there, Waldron goes on to show the two-age view of world history and it is at this point that he shows the beautiful simplicity of God's prophetic plan. He spends a good deal of time describing this and comparing the various end-times views with this model. His exposition of Revelation 20 is a particular strength in this regard. In my opinion Waldron proves his case when he states that the amil view is the biblical view.

The latter part of the book answers many of the knotty questions surrounding prophecy such as the relationship of the church and Israel, the intermediate state, heaven, hell, eternal punishment and things like this. In doing this he covers most of the bases on issues that come up.

I am thankful for this book because it is scrupulously Biblical. It is unfortunate that those who hold the amil position are often dismissed in evangelical circles. Books like this one need to be widely circulated so that the church can see that the amil view (which is the dominant historic view of the church) is clearly taught in the Scriptures. That is not to say that there are no problems or issues that can't be debated. However, those who write amils off as "non-literalists" or as those who don't take the bible seriously will have to reconsider their view if they read books like this one.

Good, Simple Introduction to Amillennialism  Jul 3, 2003
This book is a good and simple introduction to Amillenialism. This was not a complicated read, but it is a profittable read for someone new to the issues.

First the positives: This book does an excellent job showing the two-age (already/not yet) perspective from the Biblical perspective. Waldron does a good job on exegesis of the parables of Christ (Matthew 13), Paul's prose (1 Corinthians 15) and John's apocalypse (Revelation 20). He is sensitive to the diverse literary genre, unlike many.

Waldron also does a great job to show that Amillenialists do take the scripture seriously, and that we do do not spiritualize everything, as many Dispensationalists contend. Then towards the end of the book, he shows other important things to how you view Eschatology.

Now to the negatives: He holds to a strict Grammatico-Historical interpretation of the Bible, and this tends to have an autonomous bent. The Redemptive-Historical perspective (taking best of Grammatico-Historical and adding to it), however, says thatwe must view Christ as the ultimate end of all of scripture.

He also does not show that Eschatology starts in Genesis. This is to be expected since the book is an introduction, but it is a caveat of mine. The only other problem I had with the book is that on page 80 he spoke of the "plain meaning" meaning of a passage. This shows a naive view of language.

The only other problem has nothing to do with the author but the editor. There are problems with spelling, punctuation, etc. This is not the author's fault, but rests on the editor. That aside, this book is a must read for anyone new to the area of Eschatology.


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