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E.W. Kenyon The True Story [Hardcover]

By Joe McIntyre (Author)
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Item Specifications...

Pages   372
Est. Packaging Dimensions:   Length: 8.9" Width: 6" Height: 1"
Weight:   1.18 lbs.
Binding  Hardcover
Release Date   Oct 1, 1997
Publisher   Strang Communications
ISBN  0884194515  
EAN  9780884194514  


Availability  0 units.


Item Description...
Overview
Recently some books were released that viciously attacked E. W. Kenyon and the Faith Movement. These books suggested that Kenyon mixed metaphysics--specifically Christian Science and New Thought ideas--with Christianity, resulting in heresy. Is there any truth to these criticisms? After many years of research and personal study, author Joe McIntyre believes otherwise. Read for yourself the teachings of this great man of faith and how his personal relationship with God has impacted generations. It's now time to tell the true story to this generation.

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More About Joe McIntyre

Register your artisan biography and upload your photo! McIntyre is senior pastor of Word of His Grace Fellowship.

Joe McIntyre currently resides in Kirkland, in the state of Washington.

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Reviews - What do our customers think?
an entertaining biography  Feb 24, 2005
While it's apparent from some of the other reviews that this book may have flaws, I thoroughly enjoyed it. Well-written, well-researched. McIntyre offers fascinating glimpses of Kenyon's early years, and of the late 19th C and early 20thC church-era. The author may have a bias, but it's certainly no worse than one who has a bone to pick.

McIntyre reveals that Kenyon poses a curious but sympathetic character: his teachings didn't quite follow the pattern of the giants of the faith that preceded him. The author shows that Kenyon's teachings were developed after enjoying a long walk with the Lord. They were nuggets of truth his heart was set on releasing to the Church, and were not intended to be followed as quick-fix formulae. I find that the modern W-F teachers (and W-F critics too!) focus on the shock value of some of Kenyon's teachings, thus missing the forest for the trees.

McIntyre also describes some of Kenyon's failings but doesn't dwell on them. Imperfections do not disqualify one as a teacher of The Word. Robert Bowman's Word-Faith Controversy serves as a good counter balance to this book in evaluating Kenyon's teachings, many of which have done my heart good over the years while some others (which are probably wrong) remain controversial.
 
Excellent Work  Feb 6, 2005
First of all I would like to attempt to bring clarity concerning 2 previous reviews by a certain reviwer. I would have liked to dialogue with this reviewer over email or something first but his information is not available as far as I could tell.

I won't attempt to critique the whole of his reviews but I will attempt to reveal a number of seemingly inaccurate claims which I noticed right away (I had just finished the book and wanted to see what others had said about it).

In his most recent reveiw he states, "McIntyre also did this with the issue of the sovereignty of God, and skimmed past the fact that Kenyon died of disease (a malignant tumor) and took medicine."

In his first reveiw he also stated:
"One of the sources cited by McIntyre contains information that contradicts what he says regarding Kenyon's death in 1948. He knows the information that contradicts him exists, but instead of acknowledging this fact, he simply doesn't mention it and then tells what he says is the "true" story of Kenyon. This fact alone disqualifies this book from being anything more than a reference so that Faith followers can say that questions are answered that HAVEN'T been answered."

It's esepcially statements like this (i.e. "This fact alone disqualifies this book from being anything more than a reference so that Faith followers can say that questions are answered that HAVEN'T been answered") that clearly seem to be overstatment.

McIntyre actually devotes roughly 8 pages to this single topic of Kenyon's controversial death (see pgs. 167-174). How could this be understood as "skimming past the fact?" McIntyre makes a strong case that Kenyon didn't die of cancer. The great weight of the evidence (at least as presented in this book) seems to indicate that he simply died of old age- his body just wore out. On page 170 McIntyre also states that Kenyon was once reported as having used half of an aspirin after a fall that badly injured his back (which he reportedly miraculously recovered from).

McIntyre not only mentions seemingly contradictory information (like the death certificate) but specifically addresses it and discusses it openly in this same section (pp. 167-174).

As far as the sovereignty issue, this is also specifically addressed and covered by McIntyre in that same section. On page 172 McIntyre references an article that Kenyon published in 1942 in which he wrote, "I had been praying, struggling, and crying to God for healing. That old chronic difficulty had me in bondage for more than three years."

McIntyre then comments:
"The fact that he would share that struggle openly in his publication suggests that he didn't find an extended battle with sickness contrary to his understanding of our redemption and the fight of faith for healing. Kenyon clearly believed that divine health was God's perfect will, yet he didn't feel that it was a contradiction to face some serious battles with disease."

This reviewer also made the claim, "In 'dealing' with the issues, McIntyre ignored ALL of them and set up a straw man defense of Kenyon's teachings." It seems clear in light of the information provided above that this claim is, in the very least, a dramatic overstatement. This is especially evidenced by the use of the word "all."

One of the other reviewers, though he gave the book a very good rating of 4 stars, expressed disappointment that he "really didn't find hardly any direct teachings from Kenyon or additional sermons that he never published." However, after reading this work I felt just the opposite. In doing a quick search I noted some 30 references in the notes to unpublished material. I suppose it depends on one's expectations.

The fact is that this appears to be an all-around excellent work. It not only provides a great introduction to Kenyon (which it served as for me), but also provides a fascinating history of the times he lived in and of the developments in theology that were taking place. He clearly shows who Kenyon was influenced by (such as A.B. Simpson, A.J. Gordon, G. Campbell Morgan, A.T. Pierson, Andrew Murray, R.A. Torrey, Phoebe Palmer, Moody's Warriors, and a host of other saints) and brings light to the rumors about Kenyon- clearly documented light.

This edition includes 39 pages of notes, 2 appendices, a glossary of terms, and a detailed index. I was a History major in college and as far as I can tell this work is a model of good scholarship and research. Combine that with a flowing and readable text and what more could you ask for? As far as I'm concerned (at this point in my research) this work is a masterpiece of Christian history.

*Note: This review has been revised in response to another reviwer's reaction. After reading his response, I felt that this revision was necessary. I do apologize for the personal attacks, I do believe I was in the wrong, and I hope this revised edition of the review is suitable.
 
Poor Research And Poor Argumentation  Jan 12, 2005
I must say at the outset that my title is a tad misleading, and for that I apologize. The one good thing that can be said about this book is the fact that Mr. McIntyre brought out some historical facts that nobody had access to until recently. That said, I must be less than enthralled with the overall book.

The basic purpose of this book was to clear Kenyon charges of heresy teaching made by such persons as D.R. McConnell, Hank Hannegraaff, and Dave Hunt among others. And if McIntyre had actually done that, he would have made a valuable contribution to a reconsideration of Kenyon's teachings.

But instead of doing that, he began with a presupposition: despite mounds of evidence to the contrary, Kenyon did not teach heresy. In 'dealing' with the issues, McIntyre ignored ALL of them and set up a straw man defense of Kenyon's teachings. He spent three chapters presumably defending Kenyon's teaching of the 'born again' Jesus, yet he didn't really discuss that issue. Instead, he used the modern terminology JDS (for Jesus died spiritually) and insinuated that great Christian leaders of the past such as Calvin or present like Billy Graham taught the same doctrine of atonement as did Kenyon. The simple fact is that this was a bait and switch routine that should have no place in an honest airing of the facts. McIntyre also did this with the issue of the sovereignty of God, and skimmed past the fact that Kenyon died of disease (a malignant tumor) and took medicine. If one is open-minded approaching it, he will invariably come to two conclusions: first of all, Kenyon had an inflated opinion of his own teachings as witness by the subtitles of his books (for example, "The Two Kinds of Righteousness" is subtitled "The Most Important Message Ever Offered To The Church"), and the man was also a person who simply did not live his life in consistency with what he claimed the Bible taught.

On at least five separate occasions in the book, McIntyre also misquoted or misrepresented by quote the people he was critiquing, particularly D.R. McConnell (just check the cross references that McIntyre cites and you can see this for yourself). He also resorted to name calling - right after condeming it, no less - by labeling critics of Kenyon's doctrine as users of 'heresy hunting tactics.'

Simply put, the one valuable contribution consists of the story of Kenyon's early background that has been mired in confusion for some 20 years. But otherwise the book falls short all across the line: poor argumentation, misrepresentation, name calling, and miscitation of quotes. The irony is that many people who will endorse this book level those precise same charges at Word of Faith critics.

IN RESPONSE TO ANOTHER REVIEWER

I will take equal time as necessary to respond to another reviewer's points. His remarks are followed by my rebuttal.

"In his most recent reveiw Maestroh states, "McIntyre also did this with the issue of the sovereignty of God, and skimmed past the fact that Kenyon died of disease (a malignant tumor) and took medicine."

In his first reveiw maestroh also stated:
"One of the sources cited by McIntyre contains information that contradicts what he says regarding Kenyon's death in 1948. He knows the information that contradicts him exists, but instead of acknowledging this fact, he simply doesn't mention it and then tells what he says is the "true" story of Kenyon. This fact alone disqualifies this book from being anything more than a reference so that Faith followers can say that questions are answered that HAVEN'T been answered."


These statements make me question whether this reviewer even read the book thoroughly. McIntyre actually devotes roughly 8 pages to this single topic of Kenyon's controversial death (see pgs. 167-174). How could this be understood as "skimming past the fact?" McIntyre makes a strong case that Kenyon didn't die of cancer. The great weight of the evidence seems to indicate that he simply died of old age- his body just wore out. On page 170 McIntyre also states that Kenyon was once reported as having used half of an aspirin after a fall that badly injured his back (which he reporetedly miraculously recovered from).

REVIEWER RESPONSE (MAESTROH)

The FACTS are these - and you will find them distorted in this alleged 'true' story. I didn't say McIntyre didn't MENTION them, I said he SKIMMED past them. Kenyon's death certificate contained the cause of death as a malignant tumor. When discussing this issue, McIntyre poisons the well by saying that it was presented by a 'ministry critical of Kenyon' as though that makes any difference. (After all, did the ministry 'forge' the death certificate? If so, it would be relatively easy to prove). But what McIntyre DID NOT MENTION is this: Geir Lie, a strong proponent of Kenyon, demonstrated beyond reasonable doubt that Kenyon did die of a malignant tumor. Lie even had letters from Kenneth Hagin and Kenyon's daughter contradicting the tale McIntyre told (basically, Hagin admitted lying about Kenyon's death). McIntyre NEVER mentioned this which certainly calls his honesty into question. Why? Because McIntyre cites Geir Lie's work REPEATEDLY throughout so it is clear he was aware of it. The reviewer seems to think that if McIntyre MENTIONS something, it means he DISCUSSED IT IN DETAIL, which is simply not true.

And the 'great weight of evidence' the reviewer refers to is actually nothing more than McIntyre's non-professional medical opinion. The author clearly thinks that because no X-ray exists of Kenyon's cancer, this means he didn't have it. But this is wrong on a number of counts. For starters, 90% of physician diagnosis is based on medical history and a physical exam. Cancer is usually diagnosed by CT (invented in 1972 or 24 years after Kenyon's death), MRI (1979), or biopsy. X-rays were in their very early days at the time so that is irrelevant. And finally, since McIntyre is not a doctor himself - and not related to Kenyon - he wouldn't have his medical records, would he? If he did, it is still doubtful he knows what he's talking about. McIntyre's case for a 'healed Kenyon' is based SOLELY upon his desiring it to be true.

ISSUE TWO:
"As far as the sovereignty issue, this is also specifically addressed and covered by McIntyre in that same section. On page 172 McIntyre references an article that Kenyon published in 1942 in which he wrote, "I had been praying, struggling, and crying to God for healing. That old chronic difficulty had me in bondage for more than three years." McIntyre then comments:

"The fact that he would share that struggle openly in his publication suggests that he didn't find an extended battle with sickness contrary to his understanding of our redemption and the fight of faith for healing. Kenyon clearly believed that divine health was God's perfect will, yet he didn't feel that it was a contradiction to face some serious battles with disease." "

REVIWER RESPONSE

The reviwer did PRECISELY what I was talking about. McIntyre views sovereignty through healing - ignoring two major facts. First, in the Faith movement that Kenyon fathered, it is ENTIRELY up to the believer to have Faith and God has already done all He's going to do about sickness (sickness, of course, can't be God's will). Secondly, he doesn't address the wild-eyed deununciation of God's sovereignty found by this statement of Kenyon's: "It seems God is limited by our prayer life, that He can do nothing unless a man asks him. Why this is, I do not know." THAT is what I mean about sovereignty. According to Kenyon, God can't do anything unless man asks him. The Faith movement repeats this error with, "God can't do anything on Earth without man's permission." Surely this is worthy of discussion - and a defense if that's even possible. Yet nothing from Mr. McIntyre.

The most controversial teaching of the Faith movement is the notion that Jesus was born again. As I stated earlier, McIntyre never discusses it as Kenyon or his followers actually teach it. He goes and grabs quotes from others like John Calvin and insinuates that Calvin and Kenyon taught the same thing about the atonement when their ideas were poles apart.

Furthermore, in 'debunking' my review, he ignores the OBJECTIVE FACT that McIntyre misrepresented what McConnell said FIVE DIFFERENT TIMES by my own count (sometimes the quote was accurate but the information distorted by McIntyre). One only has to take the McIntyre footnote and compare it to the McConnell context to see this fact for himself.



 
McIntyre Sets the Record Straight  Jul 15, 2004
Having read several of Kenyon's life-changing books, McIntyre's book is an extremely interesting read. The book is well-written and is extremely well researched and documented. With a wealth of quotes, anecdotes, and details of Kenyon's life heretofore unpublished, McIntyre totally disarms the critics, removes misconceptions about the message of faith, and properly restores Kenyon's reputation as one of the finest of God's end time writers.

If you are one of the many Christians whose ears have been poisoned by listening to other misguided ministers malign and criticize E.W. Kenyon's books as heretical, you owe it to yourself to read this book! From it, you get a glimpse of Kenyon's heart and motivation in writing his books, his great love for his Lord and for people, and solid proof that Kenyon's message was firmly planted in orthodox soil. (In my opinion, anyone who labels Kenyon as heretical after reading McIntyre's book is attempting to willfully misunderstand Kenyon's writings.)

I would highly recommend any honest, thirsting heart that wants to know God better and anyone who wants to be everything that God wants him to be in Christ, to read all of E.W. Kenyon's books. The revelation that Kenyon unveils in the Word of God makes "ordinary" Christianity extraordinary, and will totally change the person who grabs hold of it. No wonder the devil hates Kenyon's books!

Thank you, Joe McIntyre, for writing this book and "setting the record straight." Proverbs 18:17, John 7:51

 
Excellent Read!! An Important Contribution!!  May 26, 2004
"E. W. Kenyon - The True Story" is an amazing slice of late 19th C. and early 20th C. church history. The narrative is wonderfully engaging. This book is a great read! In the face of biting, acrimonious criticism of the Faith Message that Kenyon advocated, McIntyre offers a reasoned and grace-filled response. This book communicates an important message that demands a wide readership. Some of the themes are controversial but McIntyre unpacks them with the skill of a surgeon. In so doing, the author provides a clear rationale for the biblical message of Faith - a message that has been largely abandoned by a huge segment of the Church! This book will challenge you!
 

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