Christian Books, Bibles, Music & More - 1.888.395.0572
Call our Toll Free Number:
Find us on:
Follow Us On 

Twitter!   Join Us On Facebook!

Christian Bookstore .Net is a leading online Christian book store.

Shop Christian Books, Bibles, Jewelry, Church Supplies, Homeschool Curriculum & More!

Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt [Hardcover]

By Anne Rice (Author)
Our Price $ 22.06  
Retail Value $ 25.95  
You Save $ 3.89  (15%)  
Item Number 22072  
Buy New $22.06
Out Of Stock!
Discontinued - Out Of Print
The manufacturer has discontinued this product and no longer offers it for sale. We are unable to obtain more stock.

Item Specifications...

Pages   336
Est. Packaging Dimensions:   Length: 9.3" Width: 5.5" Height: 1.2"
Weight:   1.25 lbs.
Binding  Hardcover
Release Date   Nov 1, 2005
Publisher   Knopf
ISBN  0375412018  
EAN  9780375412011  

Availability  0 units.

Alternate Formats List Price Our Price Item Number Availability
Hardcover $ 25.95 $ 22.06 22072
Paperback $ 16.00 $ 13.60 67200 In Stock
Item Description...
Presents a new novel by the author of Interview with the Vampire, incorporating the latest New Testament scholarship to chronicle the life of Jesus Christ, from his early years, through his ministry, through his final days, crucifixion, resurrection, and ascent to heaven. 500,000 first printing.

Publishers Description
Having completed the two cycles of legend to which she has devoted her career so far, Anne Rice gives us now her most ambitious and courageous book, a novel about the early years of CHRIST THE LORD, based on the Gospels and on the most respected New Testament scholarship.

The book's power derives from the passion its author brings to the writing and the way in which she summons up the voice, the presence, the words of Jesus who tells the story.
What the critics are saying about
Anne Rice's
Christ the Lord

“A riveting, reverent imagining of the hidden years of the child Jesus . . . A triumph of tone—her prose lean, vivid—and character . . . Christ the Lord is a cross between a historical novel and an update of Tolstoy's The Gospels in Brief, it presents Jesus as nature mystic, healer, prophet and very much a real young boy . . . Essentially it's a mystery story, of the child grappling to understand his miraculous gifts and numinous birth . . . As he ponders his staggering responsibility, the boy is fully believable—and yet there's something in his supernatural empathy and blazing intelligence that conveys the wondrousness of a boy like no other . . . With this novel, Anne Rice has indeed found a convincing version of him; this is fiction that transcends story and instead qualifies as an act of faith.”

Kirkus Reviews

“Rice retains our rapt attention with the use of small, visceral details. We can almost taste the food Jesus would have eaten, experience the sights and sounds, the chaos and bustle of a large clan, with which he would have been familiar.”

—Bernadette Murphy, The Los Angeles Times

“Rice is as serious as a Commandment, and has muscled up her story of the junior Jesus by obsessively researchig the most minute detail of family, communal and religious life in first-century Palestine. . . . Rice is just as ambitious, much more orthodox and just getting warming up . . . From Lestat the vampire to Jesus the Lord is a supernatural stretch but Rice makes it. Convincingly.”

—Bill Bell, Daily News

“Well-researched and nicely written and Rice uses restraint in telling her tale. She believably represents Jesus' gradual understanding of his origins and fate. . . . Reverent and often moving.”

—Natalie Danford, People

“[Rice] writes this book in a simpler, leaner style, giving it the slow but inexorable rhythm of an incantation. The restraint and prayerful beauty of Christ the Lord is apt to surprise her usual readers and attract new ones.”

—Janet Maslin, The New York Times

“Rice brings the same passion to her colorful account of the young Jesus and his quest to understand his strange powers (turning clay pigeons into live birds, bringing a dead child back to life). . . . In her attempt to breathe life into a historical religious figure, Rice's superb storytelling skills enable her to succeed where many other writers have failed. . . . Highly recommended.”

Library Journal

“This is, in fact, an intensely literal, historical, reverent treatment of a year in the life of Jesus, son of God, written in simple, sedate language that steers clear of both clanging anachronisms and those King Jamesian ye's and unto's and begats.”

—Lev Grossman, Time

“In Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt, Anne Rice scores a direct hit: By embracing the miraculous, she manages to give us a Jesus who is divinely human.”

—Frank Wilson, The Philadelphia Inquirer
Anne Rice is the author of twenty-six books. She lives in La Jolla, California.
The questions, discussion topics, and suggestions for further reading that follow are designed to enhance your group's discussion of Anne Rice's extraordinary novel about the early years of Jesus. Rice, well known for her ability to weave compelling plots and characters against a richly detailed and meticulously researched historical background, journeys to the first century and brings to life the religious beliefs and traditions, the political turmoil, and the family secrets that marked the beginning of Jesus' mission on earth.

Told in the voice of the seven-year-old Jesus, Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt is the story of his return to the Holy Land after years of exile in Egypt and his gradual–at times fearful–acceptance of the wonders and the mysteries that set him apart from all others. Rice draws on close examinations of the Gospels, the Apocrypha, and the work of respected Biblical scholars and historians to re-create Jesus' world, and in a daring, profoundly moving portrait, imagines how Jesus felt as he came to understand and embrace his destiny.

1. Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt is told in Jesus' voice. What advantages does the first-person narration offer the author? How does it contribute to the novel's emotional resonance? How does it influence the way the novel unfolds?

2. What other literary devices does Rice use to bring the story to life for the contemporary reader? Discuss, for example, her use of imagined conversations and her descriptions of the family's interactions.

3. The Gospel of Matthew and the Gospel of Luke recount the story of Jesus' birth, the flight to Egypt, and the family's return to Israel. Does Rice take liberties with these biblical versions in her retelling? To what extent does her account echo the Gospels in both content and tone?

4. Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt focuses on a period in Jesus' life not described in the New Testament. How realistic is Rice's portrait of Jesus as a young boy? How do the miracles he performs–killing and reviving Eleazer [pp. 4—7]; alleviating Cleopas' pain [p. 48] and rescuing him from death [p. 99]; and restoring sight to the blind man [pp. 279—80] –reflect feelings and wishes typical of a seven-year-old?

5. Throughout the book, Jesus questions Mary and Joseph, Cleopas, and rabbis and scholars in hopes of discovering the secret of his birth. What do the answers he receives from the various adults reflect about their relationship with Jesus, their understanding of the truth, and their own self-interests and philosophies?

6. What role does Cleopas play in his nephew's life? Why does he defy Mary and Joseph and reveal what he knows about Jesus' conception and birth [p. 45—47]? What other function does he serve in the plot? What insights do his opinions [p. 68, p.74, and p. 211, for example] give into the political situation in Israel? Is his point of view understandable in light of the history of the Jews as it is presented in the novel?

7. What makes Rice's portraits of Mary and Joseph effective? What did you admire most each of them? Are there flaws in the decisions they make?

8. Discuss the internal conflicts Jesus experiences as he pieces together the stories he hears and tries to reconcile them with his own his unsettling thoughts and fears. Do they make you feel differently about Jesus' humanity? His divinity?

9. Jesus' immersion in Jewish culture and traditions is an important aspect of the novel. What is the significance of Rice's focus on Jesus as a Jew? What insights does it give into Jesus' teachings and his ultimate mission on earth? Is the message relevant to the religious tensions in the world today?

10. Did reading Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt deepen your understanding of the origins of Christianity? Do you think readers' reactions to Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt are inevitably influenced by their personal religious beliefs and heritage?

11. In the author's note, Rice discusses her extensive research and offers a critique of recent New Testament scholarship. Do you agree with her criticism of the current “fashionable notions about Jesus” [p. 309]? Have you read articles or books that support her argument that many writers “scholars who have apparently devoted their life to New Testament scholarship, disliked Jesus Christ” [p.314]? Do you think that Rice's background and her strong Catholic faith affect the conclusions she draws?

12. Rice, who is best known for her books about vampires, expresses the hope that “Jesus will be as real to you as any other character I've ever launched into the world we share” [p. 321]. If you have read her other books, do you think that she succeeded in this goal? Whether or not you are familiar with her previous works, discuss your reactions to the following quotation: “After all, is Christ Our Lord not the ultimate supernatural hero, the ultimate outsider, the ultimate immortal of them all?” [p. 321].

I was seven years old. What do you know when you're seven years old? All my life, or so I thought, we'd been in the city of Alexandria, in the Street of the Carpenters, with the other Galileans, and sooner or later we were going home.

Late afternoon. We were playing, my gang against his, and when he ran at me again, bully that he was, bigger than me, and catching me off balance, I felt the power go out of me as I shouted: “You'll never get where you're going.”

He fell down white in the sandy earth, and they all crowded around him. The sun was hot and my chest was heaving as I looked at him. He was so limp.

In the snap of two fingers everyone drew back. It seemed the whole street went quiet except for the carpenters' hammers. I'd never heard such a quiet.

“He's dead!” Little Joseph said. And then they all took it up. “He's dead, he's dead, he's dead.”

I knew it was true. He was a bundle of arms and legs in the beaten dust.

And I was empty. The power had taken everything with it, all gone.

His mother came out of the house, and her scream went up the walls into a howl. From everywhere the women came running.

My mother lifted me off my feet. She carried me down the street and through the courtyard and into the dark of our house. All my cousins crowded in with us, and James, my big brother, pulled the curtain shut. He turned his back on the light. He said:

“Jesus did it. He killed him.” He was afraid.

“Don't you say such a thing!” said my mother. She clutched me so close to her, I could scarcely breathe.

Big Joseph woke up.

Now Big Joseph was my father, because he was married to my mother, but I'd never called him Father. I'd been taught to call him Joseph. I didn't know why.

He'd been asleep on the mat. We'd worked all day on a job in Philo's house, and he and the rest of the men had lain down in the heat of the afternoon to sleep. He climbed to his feet.

“What's that shouting outside?” he asked. “What's happened?”

He looked to James. James was his eldest son. James was the son of a wife who had died before Joseph married my mother.

James said it again.

“Jesus killed Eleazer. Jesus cursed him and he fell down dead.”

Joseph stared at me, his face still blank from sleep. There was more and more shouting in the street. He rose to his feet, and ran his hands back through his thick curly hair.

My little cousins were slipping through the door one by one and crowding around us.

My mother was trembling. “He couldn't have done it,” she said. “He wouldn't do such a thing.”

“I saw it,” said James. “I saw it when he made the sparrows out of clay on the Sabbath. The teacher told him he shouldn't do such things on the Sabbath. Jesus looked at the birds and they turned into real birds. They flew away. You saw it too. He killed Eleazer, Mother, I saw it.”

My cousins made a ring of white faces in the shadows: Little Joses, Judas, and Little Symeon and Salome, watching anxiously, afraid of being sent out. Salome was my age, and my dearest and closest. Salome was like my sister.

Then in came my mother's brother Cleopas, always the talker, who was the father of these cousins, except for Big Silas who came in now, a boy older than James. He went into the corner, and then came his brother, Justus, and both wanted to see what was going on.

“Joseph, they're all out there,” said Cleopas, “Jonathan bar Zakkai, and his brothers, they're saying Jesus killed their boy. They're envious that we got that job at Philo's house, they're envious that we got the other job before that, they're envious that we're getting more and more jobs, they're so sure they do things better than we do—.”

“Is the boy dead?” Joseph said. “Or is the boy alive?”

Salome shot forward and whispered in my ear. “Just make him come alive, Jesus, the way you made the birds come alive!”

Little Symeon was giggling. He was too little to know what was going on. Little Judas knew, but he was quiet.

“Stop,” said James, the little boss of the children. “Salome, be quiet.”

I could hear them shouting in the street. I heard other noises. Stones were hitting the walls of the house. My mother started to cry.

“You dare do that!” shouted my uncle Cleopas and he rushed back out through the door. Joseph went after him.

I wriggled out of my mother's grasp and darted out before she could catch me, and past my uncle and Joseph and right into the crowd as they were all waving and hollering and shaking their fists. I went so fast, they didn't even see me. I was like a fish in the river. I moved in and out through people who were shouting over my head until I got to Eleazer's house.

The women all had their backs to the door, and they didn't see me as I went around the edge of the room.

I went right into the dark room, where they'd laid him on the mat. His mother was there leaning on her sister and sobbing.

There was only one lamp, very weak.

Eleazer was pale with his arms at his sides, same soiled tunic, and the soles of his feet very black. He was dead. His mouth was open and his white teeth showed over his lip.

The Greek physician came in—he was really a Jew—and he knelt down, and he looked at Eleazer and he shook his head.

Then he saw me and said:


His mother turned and she saw it was me and she screamed.

I bent over him:

“Wake up, Eleazer,” I said. “Wake up now.”

I reached out and laid my hand on his forehead.

The power went out. My eyes closed. I was dizzy. But I heard him draw in his breath.

His mother screamed over and over and it hurt my ears. Her sister screamed. All the women were screaming.

I fell back on the floor. I was weak. The Greek physician was staring down at me. I was sick. The room was dim. Other people had rushed in.

Eleazer came up, and he was up all knees and fists before anyone could get to him, and he set on me and punched me and hit me, and knocked my head back against the ground, and kicked me again and again:

“Son of David, Son of David!” he shouted, mocking me, “Son of David, Son of David!” kicking me in the face, and in the ribs, until his father grabbed him around the waist and picked him up in the air.

I ached all over, couldn't breathe.

“Son of David!” Eleazer kept shouting.

Someone lifted me and carried me out of the house and into the crowd in the street. I was still gasping. I hurt all over. It seemed the whole street was screaming, worse than before, and someone said the Teacher was coming, and my uncle Cleopas was yelling in Greek at Jonathan, Eleazer's father, and Jonathan was yelling back, and Eleazer was shouting, “Son of David, Son of David!”

I was in Joseph's arms. He was trying to move, but the crowd wouldn't let him. Cleopas was pushing at Eleazer's father. Eleazer's father was trying to get at Cleopas, but other men took hold of his arms. I heard Eleazer shouting far away.

There was the Teacher declaring: “That child's not dead, you hush up, Eleazer, who said he was dead? Eleazer, stop shouting! Whoever could think this child is dead?”

“Brought him back to life, that's what he did,” said one of theirs.

We were in our courtyard, the entire crowd had pushed in with us, my uncle and Eleazer's people still screaming at each other, and the Teacher demanding order.

Now my uncles, Alphaeus and Simon, had come. These were Joseph's brothers. And they'd just woken up. They put up their hands against the crowd. Their mouths were hard and their eyes were big.

My aunts, Salome and Esther and Mary, were there, with all the cousins running and jumping as if this were a festival, except for Silas and Justus and James who stood with the men.

Then I couldn't see anymore.

I was in my mother's arms, and she had taken me into the front room. It was dark. Aunt Esther and Aunt Salome came in with her. I could hear stones hitting the house again. The Teacher raised his voice in Greek.

“There's blood on your face!” my mother whispered. “Your eye, there's blood. Your face is cut!” She was crying. “Oh, look what's happened to you,” she said. She spoke in Aramaic, our tongue which we didn't speak very much.

“I'm not hurt,” I said. I meant to say it didn't matter. Again my cousins pressed close, Salome smiling as if to say she knew I could bring him back to life, and I took her hand and squeezed it.

But there was James with his hard look.

The Teacher came into the room backwards with his hands up. Someone ripped the curtain away and the light was very bright. Joseph and his brothers came in. And so did Cleopas. All of us had to move to make room.

“You're talking about Joseph and Cleopas and Alphaeus, what do you mean drive them out!” said the Teacher to the whole crowd. “They've been with us for seven years!”

The angry family of Eleazer came almost into the room. The father himself did come into the room.

“Yes, seven years and why don't they go back to Galilee, all of them!” Eleazer's father shouted. “Seven years is too long! That boy is possessed of a demon and I tell you my son was dead!”

“Are you complaining that he's alive now! What's the matter with you!” demanded my uncle Cleopas.

Buy Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt by Anne Rice from our Christian Books store - isbn: 9780375412011 & 0375412018

The team at Christian Bookstore .Net welcome you to our Christian Book store! We offer the best selections of Christian Books, Bibles, Christian Music, Inspirational Jewelry and Clothing, Homeschool curriculum, and Church Supplies. We encourage you to purchase your copy of Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt by Anne Rice today - and if you are for any reason not happy, you have 30 days to return it. Please contact us at 1-877-205-6402 if you have any questions.

More About Anne Rice

Register your artisan biography and upload your photo! Anne Rice is the author of thirty-two books. She lives in Palm Desert, California.

Anne Rice currently resides in New Orleans, in the state of Louisiana. Anne Rice was born in 1941.

Anne Rice has published or released items in the following series...
  1. Christ the Lord
  2. Lives of the Mayfair Witches
  3. Songs of the Seraphim
  4. Vampire Chronicles
  5. Vampire Chronicles (Hardcover)
  6. Vampire Chronicles (Paperback)
  7. Wolf Gift Chronicles

Are You The Artisan or Author behind this product?
Improve our customers experience by registering for an Artisan Biography Center Homepage.

Product Categories
1Books > Subjects > Horror > Authors, A-Z > ( R ) > Rice, Anne > General   [42  similar products]
2Books > Subjects > Horror > Authors, A-Z > ( R ) > Rice, Anne > Hardcover   [6  similar products]
3Books > Subjects > Literature & Fiction > Authors, A-Z > ( R ) > Rice, Anne   [27  similar products]
4Books > Subjects > Literature & Fiction > General > Contemporary   [79254  similar products]
5Books > Subjects > Literature & Fiction > Genre Fiction > Historical   [11224  similar products]
6Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Christian Living > General   [31520  similar products]
7Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Fiction > Biblical   [410  similar products]
8Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Fiction > General   [6034  similar products]

Similar Products
Christ the Lord: The Road to Cana: Christ the Lord
Christ the Lord: The Road to Cana: Christ the Lord
Item: 422945

Called Out of Darkness: A Spiritual Confession
Called Out of Darkness: A Spiritual Confession
Item: 585784

Angel Time: The Songs of the Seraphim, Book One
Angel Time: The Songs of the Seraphim, Book One
Item: 2129326

Reviews - What do our customers think?
interesting  Mar 23, 2007
I waited until this book came out in paperback because some of the early reviews were mixed. Fortunately, I enjoyed this novel very much. For good or bad, Rice humanizes Jesus. At the end of the novel, she expresses disdain for the Gnostic gospels because, she says, they ignore the human side of Jesus. Well, I can certainly say that she has accomplished her task because, at times, I didn't even feel like I was reading about Jesus. He became just a normal, Jewish boy (as normal as you can get during those times) who is trying to come to terms with his powers and trying to figure out why everyone else thinks he is so special.

I found the book powerful and frightening. Jesus is supposed to be God, so how can He have such a normal childhood? How can He have such normal thoughts? I think Rice made the correct decision to write the book in first person. She also brings to light the Jewishness of Jesus, which is something sorely lacking in many churches today. I will definitely be reading the second volume in this series.
A compelling read  Mar 22, 2007
I am not "religious" but found it a fascinating read. For the first time in a long time I couldn't put the book down. It is neither blasphemous nor proselytizing, only a really interesting story.

The presentation viewpoint is unique, and although it is fiction the historical setting gives a perspective on the socio-political history at the time of Jesus' upbringing.

Finally, the simple makeup of the words chosen (the family was Jewish, and certainly seem so in the book :-) is excellent and shows the care of the mature and experienced author that Ms. Rice is.
A wonderful Story  Mar 19, 2007
Thank you, Anne Rice, for an impeccable novel about our Lord Jesus Christ. It was beautifully written, educating the reader of the times in which Christ lived as a child. I am eager to read the next of what I hope will be a series on Jesus's life.
Proof the no one is beyond redemption: Not Saul ... Not Anne  Mar 16, 2007
Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt is out of bondage for Anne Rice as she has declared that from now on she will only write about the Lord. This is a rich and vibrant narrative of 7 year old Yeshua. A Jewish boy whose abilities leave him in awe and confusion. Rice depicts the inner stirrings of the schoolage Messiah who origins remain a mystery to himself. Yeshua is a human child ... whose supernatural gifts ... are a statement of what is to come ... and the impact on history that his mission would leave .... beyond anyone's comprehension in his day. This is a child, a special one, who destiny fulfills the promise of Moses. Far more riveting than the old Anne. And far from enrapturing that anything from JK Rowling's dark fantasies fuel.

The Queen of the Occult is dead! Long live the Queen who has repented and returned to the Lord. None other than Anne Rice whose fame and fortune were built on stories of Vampires, Witches, and the Devil ... is now reborn as a Catholic once more. Not only does she look light and melted away pounds but she is proof that no one is beyond redemptive salvation. Only God turned Saul, the biggest Christian persecutor of his day, into Apostle Paul on the road to Damascus. In Rice's case she found a personal confessor to repent her occult promotion ways and is now applying her God given talents to celebrate Christ.
Reading this is a genuine spiritual experience.  Mar 9, 2007
For those who believe the Bible is a living document, always being written, this book would certainly be an item added to their spiritual cannon. Complimented by angelic, ethereal prose, Rice's book captures the historical and even spiritual voice of Jesus in a waybeyond that which Christians could imagine. My only criticism is that it is very much written with a Catholic sense of Jesus. However, it does much to educate those unaware of Jesus the Jew and the Jewish origins of Christianity.I never read a Rice book before until this one, and I am glad I did.

Write your own review about Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt

Customer Support: 1-888-395-0572
Welcome to Christian Bookstore .Net

Our team at Christian Bookstore .Net would like to welcome you to our site. Our Christian book store features over 150,000 Christian products including Bibles, Christian music, Christian books, jewelry, church supplies, Christian gifts, Sunday school curriculum, purity rings, homeschool curriculum and many other items to encourage you in your walk with God. Our mission is to provide you with quality Christian resources that you can benefit from and share with others. The best part is that our complete selection of Christian books and supplies is offered at up to 20% off of retail price! Please call us if you have any questions or need assistance in ordering at 1-888-395-0572. Have a blessed day.

Terms & Conditions | Privacy Policy | Site Map | Customer Support